Super Tuesday: The Morning After

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Mason Hoyt

Yesterday, 14 states and one U.S. territory cast their votes in the Democratic primary. Known as “Super Tuesday” for the sheer quantity of states participating, this marked the largest number of delegates available in a single day.

In the Democratic primary, there are 3,979 pledged delegates across all U.S. states and territories. In order for a candidate to receive the nomination by default at the Democratic National Convention, they must receive at least 1,991 delegates to secure a majority.

Heading into Super Tuesday, it appeared Bernie Sanders was poised to secure a large lead over the rest of the Democratic field. However, with the suspension of the Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar campaigns and their subsequent endorsements of Biden, it would appear the opposite is true: Sanders now trails Joe Biden by over 70 delegates.

This doesn’t fully account for every individual delegate. For example, the vote in California will likely take several days before it is fully counted. Still, it marks a significant upturn for the Biden campaign at a time when many were predicting the race turning in Sanders’s favor.

The future of Elizabeth Warren’s campaign is uncertain, given that she lost her home state of Massachusetts, but it’s unclear whether she’ll drop out or not. Mike Bloomberg has said he will “reassess” his campaign after his poor showing on Super Tuesday.

Update: As of 9:20 CST Wednesday, March 4, 2020, Mike Bloomberg has suspended his campaign. 

 

Current Delegate Count by Candidate as of 7:43 A.M. CST Wednesday, March 4, 2020:

Joe Biden – 453

Bernie Sanders – 382

Elizabeth Warren – 50

Mike Bloomberg – 44

Pete Buttigieg* – 26

Amy Klobuchar* – 7

Tulsi Gabbard – 1

*Candidate has suspended their campaign

 

Results by State as of 7:43 A.M. CST Wednesday, March 4, 2020 (excluding candidates who received no delegates):

Note: Of the following states and territories, only Oklahoma,Vermont, and Virginia have divided up all of their delegates. 

American Samoa – Bloomberg Win:

Bloomberg – 49.9% – 4 delegates

Gabbard – 29.3% – 1 delegate

 

Alabama – Biden Win:

Biden – 63.2% – 40 delegates

Sanders – 16.6% – 7 delegates

Bloomberg – 11.6% – 1 delegate

Arkansas – Biden Win:

Biden – 40.5% – 16 delegates

Sanders – 22.4% – 8 delegates

Bloomberg – 16.7% – 4 delegates

 

California – Sanders Win:

Sanders – 32.8% – 72 delegates

Biden – 24.1% – 21 delegates

Bloomberg – 14.9% – 8 delegates

Warren – 12.1% – 7 delegates

 

Colorado – Sanders Win:

Sanders – 36.2% – 20 delegates

Biden – 23.2% – 9 delegates

Bloomberg – 20.9% – 9 delegates

Warren – 17.2% – 1 delegate

 

Maine – Too Close to Call:

Biden – 33.9% – 8 delegates

Sanders – 33.1% – 8 delegates

Warren – 15.9% – 2 delegates

 

Massachusetts – Biden Win:

Biden – 33.7% – 34 delegates

Sanders – 26.6% – 26 delegates

Warren – 21.2% – 17 delegates

 

Minnesota – Biden Win:

Biden – 38.6% – 38 delegates

Sanders – 29.9% – 26 delegates

Warren – 15.4% – 10 delegates

 

North Carolina – Biden Win:

Biden – 43% – Delegate info unavailable

Sanders – 24.1% – Delegate info unavailable

Bloomberg – 13% – Delegate info unavailable

Warren – 10.5% – Delegate info unavailable

 

Oklahoma – Biden Win:

Biden – 38.7% – 21 delegates

Sanders – 25.4% – 13 delegates

Bloomberg – 13.9% – 3 delegates

Tennessee – Biden Win:

Biden – 41.5% – 28 delegates

Sanders – 24.7% – 15 delegates

Bloomberg – 15.9% – 7 delegates

Warren – 10.1% – 1 delegate

 

Texas – Biden Win:

Biden – 33.6% – 56 delegates

Sanders – 30% – 50 delegates

Bloomberg – 14.7% – 4 delegates

 

Utah – Sanders Win:

Sanders – 34.6% – 9 delegates

Bloomberg – 16.9% – 2 delegates

Biden – 17.1% – 1 delegate

 

Vermont – Sanders Win:

Sanders – 50.7% – 11 delegates

Biden – 22% – 5 delegates

 

Virginia – Biden Win:

Biden – 53.3% – 66 delegates

Sanders – 23.1% – 31 delegates

Warren – 10.8% – 2 delegates