Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby: Millikin University’s Sexual Responsibility Week

Emily Chudzik, Staff Writer

Practicing abstinence doesn’t make you lame. If you and your significant other are not having sex, it doesn’t mean you don’t love each other. Sexual Responsibility Week was the week of February 7 through Feb 15, and is dedicated to keeping students’ love lives safe.

“The goal of this week is for students to be aware of how to love without having sex,” said Tonya Hines, coordinator of the Office of Inclusion and Student Engagement. The office posted flyers on Facebook and in Shilling and RTUC titled “101 Ways to Love without Having Sex.”

The posters have examples of how to show your love for your significant other in ways that are not sexual activities. ISE encouraged students post pictures while they perform the challenge on the poster to Facebook on the Millikin University Office of Inclusion and Student Engagement page. The pictures to receive the most likes won a pre-made gift basket, including teddy bears, the movie Pretty in Pink, popcorn, champagne glasses to go with the sparkling strawberry drink and hearts containing candy.

“It’s a social media campaign,” Hines said. “So many students are into social media, so it’s a good way to keep them involved. The office of Inclusion and Student Engagement is the hub of where all the events come out of.”

In addition to what the office is doing, the Office of Residence Life has its own version of keeping students safe. One of the most well-known events is Condom Bingo hosted by the Student Housing Council, and took place on Thursday, February 13 at 6:00 pm in lower RTUC.

On the other hand, if you and your partner choose to have sex, learning about being safe doesn’t have to be awkward. “We [also] want students to be aware of all the possible consequences you can run into if you choose to have sex,” Hines said.

This week is supposed to teach students how to be safe in every possible way. Throughout the week, representatives passed out candy with facts about safe sex during cafeteria hours. For example, facts about male and female condoms were attached to a bag of candy hearts. “The way we deliver these facts is unique,” Hines said. “We get people excited about the chance of winning a prize without putting them in an uncomfortable situation.”

While learning about safe sex is important, a classroom setting like a health class can sometimes deter students from wanting to learn about it.

The most important thing this week is to keep aware. Know where you and your partner stand, and know your own limitations. It’s always better to be safe than sorry!