Hispanic Internships

Kayce Fuentes, Staff Writer

Conveniently placed in Hispanic heritage month, new opportunities are here at Millikin with a discussion on Hispanic Internships.

Dr. J Mark Munoz had an abundance to say about internships, particularly for the Hispanic community. But what exactly is an internship? Vocabulary.com defines it as “a temporary position with an emphasis on on-the-job training rather than merely employment, and it can be paid or unpaid.”

According to Millikin’s website, “Internships serve as a great way for you to ‘try out’ a career or industry to see if it’s right for you. They allow you to take theory and knowledge learned in the classroom and applies it to real world situations. Additionally, they are a way to clarify or confirm career goals. Employers seek job candidates with real world experience and internships are the preferred recruiting tool of most all employers.”

Munoz defines Hispanic internships similarly by saying that, “The term can be defined in many ways, depending on the objective. In my view, the term means getting work experience in a Hispanic work environment.”

He then continued to describe the doors this kind of opportunity could open up saying that, “The Hispanic Latino community in the US is a growing important minority segment. Exposure to this segment would lead to personal development, cultural appreciation, and enhanced career preparation.”

He went on to explain the types of experiences one could receive while working in an internship saying that, “It depends on the type of work done. But, enhancement of language skills, cultural appreciation, and cross-cultural management skills are possibilities.”

For those interested in getting an internship Munoz advises, “The Millikin Career Center can help, and so can professors. One can also take the initiative and reach out to companies and individuals that one hopes to learn from.”

Dr. Munoz concluded with, “Aligning your internship with your personal and career goals would be beneficial. For example, if you want to be an international sales manager, learning a foreign language would be a good idea. Having a minor in international studies or international business would help. Studying abroad or doing an internship with a Hispanic organization would enhance your knowledge significantly.”

Many people will tell you that knowing a second language looks great on a resume so maybe it is time to look into a Hispanic internship.